Writing: search engine entries

Some might keep a writing diary, others save all those notes on dirty napkins, past drafts, character drawings and what not. I, too, do some of these things because it’s wonderful to see how a story has developed. But I have a new ritual in the same spirit.

Search engine entries.

Because I research (well, the details at least) while writing, I do use online search engines a lot during the course of writing the first draft. So now I’ve started noting down what entries guide me right. Some examples from recent The Landskapë Saga book 2 writing sessions:

  • metals
  • heike monogatari
  • japanese house plans
  • shades of orange
  • ear parts external
  • moonshine liquor

Will keep updating this list, primarily on Twitter. It says something about the inspiration behind a work, I think. And something about where my knowledge needs some polishing, haha.

xoxo N.

Amalgam

If you ask me where I’m from, I might have an answer I’m pretty sure is right. But if you ask me where “home” is, things get messy.

The thing is, I’ve moved around a fair bit – London, Stockholm, Oslo, Tokyo … – and I seem to find “home” wherever I go. And when I leave, a little piece of that place comes with me. After about six years on the road, as it were, I’ve become a sort of amalgam of all these places.

Here’s an example of how this amalgamity (is that a word?) expresses itself. ThisDSC00390 was post-Japan and I was living in a student corridor west of London. A guy I’d hardly spoken to came into the kitchen while I was cooking and sat down by the table. I believe we said hello and such pleasantries but not more. After a while (my soba noodles were cooking), he said, “Excuse me.”
Me: “Yes?”
“Have you spent any significant time in Asia?”
Slightly confounded at this seemingly random guess (I’d not mentioned my year in Tokyo to this particular flatmate, nor to the others if I can recall) I checked the texture of my noodles before answering, “Yes, but what makes you say that?”
He looked at me, then turned his eyes to the pot where I was stirring in the water. “Because,” he said, with a straight face, “because people don’t usually stir with chopsticks.”

Tokyo, that beloved city, will always be with me in spirit. It’s such a lovely and exciting place! If you get the chance, do go. And, please, say konnichiwa from me.

xoxo N.

Review: Wander Dust (Warren)

Wander Dust (The Seraphina Parrish Trilogy, #1)Wander Dust by Michelle Warren
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Here’s one of those novels where you wish you could step right into the story and live among the characters.

Meet Seraphina, licensed time traveller and expert at getting into trouble. For all intents and purposes she considers herself a normal person, albeit with an emotionally distant father, a deceased mother and a seemingly incurable inability to belong anywhere. So when she starts seeing things no-one else can see and suddenly finds herself in a city miles away, twenty years ago, she kind of starts wondering. Soon she’s about to find out her true destiny.

Wander Dust has time travel, friendship and deceit, and a steamy head-over-heels romance (NB! Love triangle free-ish, at least not in this first part). The best thing about the universe of Seraphina is that the secret world is superimposed in the ”real” one with splendid conviction and invisible seams, which gives it a tangible character.

A pleasant read with thrilling action and exciting adventure! Much inclined to reading the second book!

xoxo N.

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